07 April 2021
The Chang'e 4 lunar lander and rover have resumed work for a 29th lunar day on the far side of the Moon.
The lander woke up on 6 April at 21:43 BJT, and the Yutu 2 rover, awoke at 3:54 BJT, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Programme Centre of the China National Space Administration. So far, the Chang'e 4 probe has survived about 825 Earth days on the Moon. Located in the northwest of Chang'e 4's landing site, the rover has traveled about 682.8 m. The line-of-sight distance between the rover and the lander is about 455 m. During its 29th lunar day, the rover will continue to move northwest toward the basalt distribution area located about 1.2 km away from the rover. The equipment aboard the rover, including a panoramic camera, an infrared imaging spectrometer, a neutral atom detector and a lunar radar, will continue to carry out scientific explorations.
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07 April 2021
Hussein Askary of the Belt and Road Institute in Sweden (BRIX) talks with Brian Harvey not only about the importance of the Space Silk Road but also about the history of the Chinese space programme, its goals and milestones and how international space cooperation plays a big role for China.
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05 April 2021
Blaine Curcio of Orbital Gateway Consulting and Jean Deville of The China Aerospace Blog are reporting for SpaceWatch.Global on China's main space events of the last week. This time the two experts cover the latest news from the commercial space sector in China including Expace and Xingyun, and Geely's plans for establishing its space headquarters in Nansha, Guangzhou.
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31 March 2021
On 31 March at 06:45 BJT, China sent a new Earth observation satellite into space from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre. The satellite, Gaofen-12 02, was launched aboard a CZ-4C rocket and entered its planned orbit successfully.
The satellite will be used in land surveys, urban planning, road network design and crop yield estimation, as well as disaster relief.
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31 March 2021
As of 31 March, astronomers from all over the world can visit http://fast.bao.ac.cn/proposal_submit to submit their applications for observation time at the FAST facility, said the National Astronomical Observatories under the Chinese Academy of Sciences in a statement. All foreign applications will be evaluated, and the results will be announced on 20 July 2021. Observations by international users will begin in August. The statement noted that FAST will provide its research facilities to the world with a more open attitude, offering more observation options for the international astronomical community. As reported before, 10 % of the observation time (around 450 h) can be allocated for international researchers. There is currently no restriction on the proposals, but the telescope is prioritized to study topics including the interstellar medium composed of neutral atomic hydrogen, the polarization of spiral galaxies, and fast radio bursts-transient radio pulses caused by some high-energy astrophysical process not fully understood.
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23 March 2021
Blaine Curcio of Orbital Gateway Consulting and Jean Deville of The China Aerospace Blog are reporting for SpaceWatch.Global on China's main space events of the last week. This time, the two experts focus on the latest news coming out from China’s leading commercial EO company: CGSTL - Chang Guang Satellite Technology Co. Ltd.(Charming Globe), from CASIC’s narrowband constellation project Xingyun, the latest developments at the Daxing aerospace base, and the pictures taken by Tianwen 1 and Spacety’s SAR images of the Suez Canal.
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