29 May 2020
Chinese scientists have come up with an ingenious alternative to nuclear obliteration for neutralising the threat of potentially Earth-shattering asteroids - staging a cosmic collision to knock the offending rocky mass off course. While NASA has long advocated the use of nuclear weapons to neutralise the threat of so-called potentially hazardous asteroids, detonating a warhead in space is not without its problems or controversy. The alternative, according to a team from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is to send an unmanned spacecraft out to meet the incoming threat and deflect it out of harm’s way.
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31 May 2020
China launched on 31 May at 16:53 h (Beijing Time) on board a CZ-2D the Gaofen-9 and HEAD-4 from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in the northwest of the country. The satellites were successfully placed in orbit.
As an optical remote sensing satellite, Gaofen-9 is capable of providing photographs with a resolution of about one meter.
It will be used in land surveys, urban planning, road network design and crop yield estimates, as well as disaster relief. It can also serve projects along the Belt-and-Road region.
The other satellite, HEAD-4, was developed by Beijing-based HEAD Aerospace Technology Co. Ltd. It can carry out on-orbit information collection, including that on ships and aircraft, and the Internet of Things.
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29 May 2020
Mandy Mayfield is looking for National Defence Magazine at the different evaluations of China's lunar ambitions by US analysts: "Some members of the space community are sounding the alarm as China indicates it may seek to establish a commanding position in cislunar space, to include the area near the Moon’s orbit. Experts say China’s ambitious plans raise important questions about the national security implications of cislunar space..." Mandy Mayfield is asking Rep. Doug Lamborn, Brian Weeden and Dean Cheng to explain their views on the topic.
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29 May 2020
Chinese engineers opened the re-entry module of the prototype of China's new-generation manned spacecraft that returned to Earth earlier this month, distributing items inside it to their owners. Nearly 100 items, ranging from test equipment and experimental devices to cultural products, were sent into space inside the module. Dozens of items carried by the re-entry module were delivered to related parties at a ceremony on 29 May afternoon at the China Academy of Space Technology in Beijing - nationals flags of Pakistan and Argentina were given to diplomats from the two countries; a 3D printer was handed over to the Chinese Academy of Sciences; plant seeds were returned to researchers from several provinces; and scientific experimental equipment were delivered to their developers.
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30 May 2020
On 30 May at 04:13 BJT (29 May, 20:13 UTC), the Long March 11 launched from Xichang Satellite Launch Centre two technology test satellites "G" and "H". The satellites successfully entered the planned orbit. The new technology test satellites G and H are mainly used for in-orbit testing of new Earth observation technology. The mission is the 332th flight of the Long March series, and it was also the first time that the long Chang Zheng 11 was launched from Xichang.
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footage from the launch and the mission control and operations centre - or here 

28 May 2020
Scientists will be included among China's third batch of astronauts as the country opens up its space program to a wider range of talents, Zhou Jianping, Chief Designer of China's manned space programme, said in Beijing on 26 May. The selection will be completed around July, added Zhou in an online interview on the sidelines of the third session of the 13th National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative
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